lunes, septiembre 17, 2007

EN BUSCA DE STEVE DITKO


Anoche se emitió en la BBC el documental de Jonathan Ross IN SEARCH OF STEVE DITKO. A ver si alguien lo sube pronto al Tubo.

--Reseña de The Guardian, la he visto también de The Beat:

Ditko's art is genuinely unique. Some artists are masters at exaggerating the body - the greats like Kirby, Jim Steranko and Neil Adams, all of whom can draw a figure in two dimensions yet somehow create the illusion that they are bursting right out of the panel - the page, even - in glorious 3D. In that respect, Ditko was a little more restrained. His characters look more like they are dancing, or carrying off an especially difficult gymnastics routine - they have grace and poise and finesse rather than brutal strength and power. But the faces really tell the story. Ditko draws expressions better than anyone. They can look quizzical or delighted, they can look bored or thoughtful, mildly bothered or furious to the point of aneurysm. And once the stories get going, the faces go crazy - eyes bulging, sweat dripping, mouths wide in terror.

And his backgrounds are tremendous. He redefined New York in those early issues of Spider-Man - for the first time in the history of the genre placing one of these crazy outfitted superfreaks in a recognisable, modern, real city. He was equally adept when it came to the fantastic, creating for Dr Strange fabulously imagined dimensions that earned him a following throughout the 60s from acid freaks who were convinced that Sturdy Steve was dropping tabs while sketching for Marvel. Not true, of course, but the fact that he came up with these landscapes and characters while totally straight and sober was understandably difficult to grasp.

-------------

Más Ditko: LA MAGIA DE LA SERIE BÉ, en El Blog Ausente: 1961, Stan Lee & Steve Ditko